29
SEP
2015

Rugby World Cup 2015 – A defining weekend?

Another tremendous few days of rugby dominated by the already legendary England V Wales match at Twickenham on Saturday night. The gap between the top nations and the smaller ‘tier two’ playing nations is closing. The International Rugby Board diverts large amounts of money from the world cups into coaching, playing and infra-structure development in the smaller rugby nations and it’s starting to show. Following on from Japan’s triumph over the Springboks the less fancied sides have been encouraged to have a real go at their fancied opponents. There is no point in just trying to hang on and restrict their points. If you’re going to lose you might as well go down all guns blazing is the attitude and the result is one of the most enjoyable world cups we have ever seen. On Saturday Canada should have beaten Italy. There are no two ways about it, the Canadians completely outplayed their more fancied rivals from the six nations. The one thing that they lacked was the composure to finish off their chances. They created enough try scoring opportunities to have won the match quite comfortably but when they needed a cool head to apply the finishing touch, it wasn’t there. Hurried passes, knock-ons, or frantic attempts to reach the line when a team mate was better placed cost the Canucks dear and another historic ‘giant killing’ slipped away from them, final score 23 – 18.

Elsewhere the All Blacks overcame a spirited Namibian team. The greatest cheer of the night was reserved for the South West Africans’ try in a 58 – 14 defeat. Argentine beat Georgia 54 – 9 and in one of the most physical games of the tournament thus far the Springboks overcame Samoa 46 – 6.

Then came the Saturday night clash of the two British heavyweights in pool ‘A’. After an hour of play it looked like England were certain winners. They had dominated the scrums and lineouts and looked to have the Welsh bottled up as an attacking threat. At 22 – 12 it seemed as good as over. However Welsh tenacity, English indiscipline and the accurate goal kicking of Dan Biggar kept Wales in the hunt. They gradually clawed their way back as England tried to slow down and close out the game too early. The final try by the Welsh was a triumph for courage and refusal to be beaten, but the cost, in injury terms, could yet derail their tournament. Final score England 25, Wales 28.

Wales are struggling with a growing injury list and so are England, but spare a thought for Springbok captain Jean De Villiers. In November 2014 he suffered a serious knee injury playing for the Boks against Wales in Cardiff. The joint was re-built with artificial ligaments but it was feared that he wouldn’t be fit for the world cup. Revealing his indefatigable character, De Villiers fought his way back to fitness and re-joined the squad. His recovery was hailed as nothing short of miraculous but during his come-back match against Argentina in August his jaw was broken. Once again his world cup chances were written off by everyone bar De Villiers. He had the jaw wired, kept up a training regime which saw him lose over a stone in weight due to obvious dietary restrictions, but he was back in the squad in time to lead his country to the world cup. On Saturday the jaw was broken again during the match against Samoa. He has since announced his retirement from international rugby. A true sportsman, hard but fair and as tough as they come. He is a loss to the game.

Elsewhere Australia put part timers Uruguay to the sword, 65 – 3. Scotland kept up their winning ways, eventually overcoming the USA 39 – 16, in spite of being behind at half time. Ireland beat Romania 44 – 10 at Wembley in front of a rugby world cup, record crowd of 89,267.

29
SEP
2015

Muntons officially open new Anaerobic Digester plant

The 25th September saw the official opening of Muntons new Anaerobic Digester plant, with The Baroness Scott of Needham Market performing the ceremonial cutting of the ribbon.

As an environmentally conscientious manufacturer, the decision for Muntons to invest £5.4 million in the new plant was a simple one to make, assisting greatly with the sustainability of their business. Alan Ridealgh, Muntons Managing Director, explains: “We were spending £750,000 every year paying for 3,000 truck-loads of residue from our processes to be removed from our site. Now this same residue is processed in our Anaerobic Digester (AD) plant and produces 25% of our annual site electricity demand. The resultant bio-fertiliser is now sold to local farms to enrich fields used to grow cereals such as our prime raw material – malting barley.”

The ceremony opened with a brief presentation introducing Muntons and exploring the business rationale to build the AD plant. A brief one-minute video of the entire construction process followed and the assembled dignitaries then gathered at the opening of the AD plant to witness the cutting of the ribbon. The Baroness Scott of Needham Market dutifully performed the ritual and commented: “It is a great privilege to have been invited to open this facility today. Muntons are a company with their roots firmly established in the local area and this new plant is an important commitment to the Stowmarket site and the environment.”

Nigel Davies, Muntons Manufacturing and Sustainability Director said: “”The generation of highly nutritive fertiliser is a genuine cradle to cradle process by returning to our growers material generated solely from malting barley. The co-generation of electricity diminishes our reliance on grid electricity which we know is under pressure due to the need to upgrade the delivery infrastructure”

Muntons buy almost all of their malting barley from within a 50 mile radius of the maltings, purchasing a quarter of a million tonnes across their company. They make malt and a wide variety of malted ingredients which are sold to over 60 countries globally. These products are used in beer and whisky production but also importantly in a host of food products from malt vinegar to chocolate confectionery. It is the residue from the barley used in their production processes which form the raw material for the AD plant. This makes Muntons a little unique as all of the products used in their AD plant are totally traceable and food safe.

It is anticipated that about 3,000 tonnes of Bio-fertiliser will be produced in their AD plant, pasteurised and centrifuged, providing a useful source of nutrition for local farms – effectively closing the circle: barley from local farms, grown into malt, residues feeding AD plant and finally going back to farm to feed the new crop.

Of course there is the added bonus that the AD plant generates electricity from the gas released during the AD process – sufficient to cover 25% of Muntons site usage. This is energy used where it is generated. Good for the environment (and Muntons too).

This investment more than anything else, underlines Muntons serious commitment to the sustainability agenda. They know that it is vital that businesses take practical steps to reduce their environmental impact. Their strap line sums this up well: ‘P.S. Practical Sustainability – It’s no afterthought.’

29
SEP
2015

Muntons officially open new Anaerobic Digester plant

The 25th September saw the official opening of Muntons new Anaerobic Digester plant, with The Baroness Scott of Needham Market performing the ceremonial cutting of the ribbon.

As an environmentally conscientious manufacturer, the decision for Muntons to invest £5.4 million in the new plant was a simple one to make, assisting greatly with the sustainability of their business. Alan Ridealgh, Muntons Managing Director, explains: “We were spending £750,000 every year paying for 3,000 truck-loads of residue from our processes to be removed from our site. Now this same residue is processed in our Anaerobic Digester (AD) plant and produces 25% of our annual site electricity demand. The resultant bio-fertiliser is now sold to local farms to enrich fields used to grow cereals such as our prime raw material – malting barley.”

The ceremony opened with a brief presentation introducing Muntons and exploring the business rationale to build the AD plant. A brief one-minute video of the entire construction process followed and the assembled dignitaries then gathered at the opening of the AD plant to witness the cutting of the ribbon. The Baroness Scott of Needham Market dutifully performed the ritual and commented: “It is a great privilege to have been invited to open this facility today. Muntons are a company with their roots firmly established in the local area and this new plant is an important commitment to the Stowmarket site and the environment.”

Nigel Davies, Muntons Manufacturing and Sustainability Director said: “”The generation of highly nutritive fertiliser is a genuine cradle to cradle process by returning to our growers material generated solely from malting barley. The co-generation of electricity diminishes our reliance on grid electricity which we know is under pressure due to the need to upgrade the delivery infrastructure”

Muntons buy almost all of their malting barley from within a 50 mile radius of the maltings, purchasing a quarter of a million tonnes across their company. They make malt and a wide variety of malted ingredients which are sold to over 60 countries globally. These products are used in beer and whisky production but also importantly in a host of food products from malt vinegar to chocolate confectionery. It is the residue from the barley used in their production processes which form the raw material for the AD plant. This makes Muntons a little unique as all of the products used in their AD plant are totally traceable and food safe.

It is anticipated that about 3,000 tonnes of Bio-fertiliser will be produced in their AD plant, pasteurised and centrifuged, providing a useful source of nutrition for local farms – effectively closing the circle: barley from local farms, grown into malt, residues feeding AD plant and finally going back to farm to feed the new crop.

Of course there is the added bonus that the AD plant generates electricity from the gas released during the AD process – sufficient to cover 25% of Muntons site usage. This is energy used where it is generated. Good for the environment (and Muntons too).

This investment more than anything else, underlines Muntons serious commitment to the sustainability agenda. They know that it is vital that businesses take practical steps to reduce their environmental impact. Their strap line sums this up well: ‘P.S. Practical Sustainability – It’s no afterthought.’

29
SEP
2015

Muntons officially open new Anaerobic Digester plant

The 25th September saw the official opening of Muntons new Anaerobic Digester plant, with The Baroness Scott of Needham Market performing the ceremonial cutting of the ribbon.

As an environmentally conscientious manufacturer, the decision for Muntons to invest £5.4 million in the new plant was a simple one to make, assisting greatly with the sustainability of their business. Alan Ridealgh, Muntons Managing Director, explains: “We were spending £750,000 every year paying for 3,000 truck-loads of residue from our processes to be removed from our site. Now this same residue is processed in our Anaerobic Digester (AD) plant and produces 25% of our annual site electricity demand. The resultant bio-fertiliser is now sold to local farms to enrich fields used to grow cereals such as our prime raw material – malting barley.”

The ceremony opened with a brief presentation introducing Muntons and exploring the business rationale to build the AD plant. A brief one-minute video of the entire construction process followed and the assembled dignitaries then gathered at the opening of the AD plant to witness the cutting of the ribbon. The Baroness Scott of Needham Market dutifully performed the ritual and commented: “It is a great privilege to have been invited to open this facility today. Muntons are a company with their roots firmly established in the local area and this new plant is an important commitment to the Stowmarket site and the environment.”

Nigel Davies, Muntons Manufacturing and Sustainability Director said: “”The generation of highly nutritive fertiliser is a genuine cradle to cradle process by returning to our growers material generated solely from malting barley. The co-generation of electricity diminishes our reliance on grid electricity which we know is under pressure due to the need to upgrade the delivery infrastructure”

Muntons buy almost all of their malting barley from within a 50 mile radius of the maltings, purchasing a quarter of a million tonnes across their company. They make malt and a wide variety of malted ingredients which are sold to over 60 countries globally. These products are used in beer and whisky production but also importantly in a host of food products from malt vinegar to chocolate confectionery. It is the residue from the barley used in their production processes which form the raw material for the AD plant. This makes Muntons a little unique as all of the products used in their AD plant are totally traceable and food safe.

It is anticipated that about 3,000 tonnes of Bio-fertiliser will be produced in their AD plant, pasteurised and centrifuged, providing a useful source of nutrition for local farms – effectively closing the circle: barley from local farms, grown into malt, residues feeding AD plant and finally going back to farm to feed the new crop.

Of course there is the added bonus that the AD plant generates electricity from the gas released during the AD process – sufficient to cover 25% of Muntons site usage. This is energy used where it is generated. Good for the environment (and Muntons too).

This investment more than anything else, underlines Muntons serious commitment to the sustainability agenda. They know that it is vital that businesses take practical steps to reduce their environmental impact. Their strap line sums this up well: ‘P.S. Practical Sustainability – It’s no afterthought.’

24
SEP
2015

Rugby World Cup 2015 – The Mid-Week Maul

Scotland’s world cup finally got underway with a morale boosting 45 – 10 win over tournament darlings, Japan. So if they can beat the Japanese this easily, they should be able to deal quite comfortably with the Springboks who were vanquished by these same Japanese, right? Unfortunately not. This victory owed as much to some very ‘charitable’ refereeing, and the short time that the Japanese had to recover from their titanic victory over the Springboks, as it did to Scottish excellence.

Let me expand…

Imagine being pummelled for an hour and a half by a group of highly trained athletes, all weighing in around the fifteen/sixteen stone mark, and some considerably heavier. Apart from the really heavy knocks which are painfully apparent, you notice all sorts of other cuts, bruises and strains after the adrenaline has worn off in the ice bath or at the post-match reception. By the end of the evening it’s a stiff walk back to the team bus. The next morning you sometimes have to roll out of bed and get up from your knees, using the mattress to pull and push yourself upright. That’s a rest day. A chance to study video of your next opponent and perhaps a little swimming or a massage, if the bruising isn’t too tender! The following day is a little better. Stretching will allow you to do some light training – jogging through set moves or some line out work perhaps, but little more. On the third day the team will have the ‘captain’s run’ at the match venue. On a seven day turnaround this would come on the Friday. It’s a chance to run through your strategies against make believe opponents, a bit like shadow boxing for rugby players. It would normally be done at full pace but three days after a match some players, (usually those in their thirties) are still a little stiff and require plenty of stretching and a massage from the team physio – often loosening up tightness in muscles/joints where old injuries are still making their presence felt. So to matchday. After fifty minutes you’ve got new cuts bruises and strains on top of the others. The calories that you’ve been putting into your body since the last game have been replacing lost energy from that test rather than building up fresh reserves for this contest. You tire. You lack your usual spark, vitality and creativity. Tightness in muscles can lead to injuries. The upshot is that against a decent side, like Scotland, you lose and that magnificent win over the Springboks looks like a bizarre fluke. Let’s hope that this excellent Japanese side has a chance to redeem itself and show the world that they really are a side to be reckoned with.

Elsewhere, in England’s group ‘A’, Australia overcame the Fijian behemoths 28 – 13 but, unlike England, they failed to secure a bonus point, only managing to score three tries. The tournament’s other match saw France overcome Romania 38 – 11. The Romanians have been rebuilding everything in their country since the revolution and rugby is one of the things that, I’m sure, will steadily improve now that the country is finding its place in the world once more.

Looking ahead to the weekend we will have one of the defining games of the tournament when England face Wales at Twickenham on Saturday evening – 8.00pm kick off, and if you think the games thus far have been fairly brutal, in the words of the song, you ain’t seen nothing yet!

21
SEP
2015

Courage Directors

Distinctly superior by name and nature, Courage Directors was originally brewed exclusively for the directors of the Alton brewery until demand decreed this most distinguished of beverages was also made available to the rank and file. A good job too. The ruling class knew just what they were doing when they tried to keep this classic ale to themselves. A rich, chestnut hued, full-bodied brew boasting a clean, bitter taste balanced with burnt, orange peel notes and a dry-hop aroma and flavour, Directors is today as rightly popular across the entire country as it is in its native London heartlands.

AVAILABLE NOW

Find your nearest stockist here

Click here for the retailer marketing support area

20
SEP
2015

Rugby World Cup 2015 – Opening Weekend

As opening weekends go this was a real attention grabber with thrills, upsets, hopes and fears all stoked by the opening salvoes. The third biggest sporting event on earth had to open with some flamboyance, but as this is rugby the organisers didn’t want to go overboard so the designers of the opening ceremony were given twenty minutes to put on a show, and twenty minutes to clear the pitch before the first game kicked off! The result was an amusing diversion featuring Prince Harry and numerous former greats of rugby from around the world.

As hosts, England began the tournament at Twickenham against pool ‘A’ rivals, Fiji. The Pacific Islanders have enjoyed great form in the run in to the cup and with players like the twenty stone, six foot five winger (!!!) Nadolo, they are a frightening prospect. However, as the rain came down, the England team, playing in red to accommodate their visitors, weathered the rugby storm as well as the elemental one and calmly took control over the eighty minutes to record a 35 – 11 victory. In the ‘round robin’ pool stages, teams gain four points for a win, two for a draw, a bonus point for scoring four tries or more in a match, or a losing bonus point if they are beaten by seven points or less, thus encouraging losing sides to keep fighting to the last whistle. Chris Robshaw’s team thus got off to a fine start with a five point haul.

Elsewhere Ireland and wales overcame slightly less formidable opposition and also came through with bonus point wins. Ireland defeated Canada 50 – 7 and Wales, who are contesting the same pool as England, beat Uruguay, the only team in the tournament which is still amateur, 54 – 9. Sadly for Wales, whose team is already depleted by injuries, their players picked up some more knocks. Hat-trick scorer Cory Allen was ruled out of the rest of the tournament with a hamstring injury and Liam Williams who has assumed a vital role as the replacement for the injured British Lion, Leigh Halfpenny, limped from the field with a dead leg, the seriousness of which will be assessed over the next couple of days. With a huge game against England at Twickenham next Saturday the Welsh team management will be hoping he recovers in time.

The main talking point of the weekend was Japan’s humbling of the mighty Springboks. In a pulsating, end to end thriller of a match, Japan scored a try in the fourth minute of overtime to take the victory by 34 – 32. The South Africans have won the World Cup twice while the Japanese have only ever won one pool game at previous tournaments but they were worthy of their triumph. Lacking the physical size of the Africans the ‘Brave Blossoms’, as they are nick-named, put a perfect team effort together and played with pace, zeal and tremendous courage to overwhelm their opponents with sheer tenacity and grit. At the final whistle players and supporters alike were overcome with emotion and the tears flowed on the pitch and in the stands. Their next opponents are Scotland who start their tournament on Wednesday against the now tired, but very confident, men from the land of the Rising Sun.

The organisers couldn’t have hoped for a better opening weekend with a colourful, party atmosphere at all the venues very evident even on the TV coverage with ITV and ITV4 showing all of the games live. It was great to see fans from all over the world enjoying the rugby, cheering, singing and even crying for joy, side by side with their rivals.

ROUND 1 RESULTS: England 35 Fiji 11, Tonga 10 Georgia 17, Ireland 50 Canada 7, S Africa 32 Japan 34, France 32 Italy 10, Samoa 25 USA 16, Wales 54 Uruguay 9, New Zealand 26 Argentina 16.

03
SEP
2015

New St Peters Beer Kit – Honey Porter

Muntons are pleased to announce the new addition of the Honey Porter to the St Peter’s brewery beer kit range. This 3kg kit brews 40 pints of traditional English porter with a sweet honey taste and aroma. Developed by Muntons, tested and approved by the head brewer at the St Peter’s Brewery. Honey Porter is the fifth beer kit in the popular St Peters brewery kit range.

The kit is based on the bronze award winning recipe (the national honey show 2012) of the St Peter’s brewery Honey Porter. This 40 pint kit brews a rich and sweet porter with a final strength of approx. 4.5 % ABV. Enjoy the unique taste of St Peters beer brewed by your own fair hand.

Established in 1996, St Peter’s brewery is based in Suffolk and is housed in the grounds of the medieval St Peter’s Hall. The brewery produces a wide variety of different beers including many seasonal specials.

As little treat 100 beer mats from St Peters can be found in 100 kits from our first production run, make sure you get your kit early to stand a chance of finding one of these free gifts!

03
SEP
2015

New St Peters Beer Kit – Honey Porter

Muntons are pleased to announce the new addition of the Honey Porter to the St Peter’s brewery beer kit range. This 3kg kit brews 40 pints of traditional English porter with a sweet honey taste and aroma. Developed by Muntons, tested and approved by the head brewer at the St Peter’s Brewery. Honey Porter is the fifth beer kit in the popular St Peters brewery kit range.

The kit is based on the bronze award winning recipe (the national honey show 2012) of the St Peter’s brewery Honey Porter. This 40 pint kit brews a rich and sweet porter with a final strength of approx. 4.5 % ABV. Enjoy the unique taste of St Peters beer brewed by your own fair hand.

Established in 1996, St Peter’s brewery is based in Suffolk and is housed in the grounds of the medieval St Peter’s Hall. The brewery produces a wide variety of different beers including many seasonal specials.

As little treat 100 beer mats from St Peters can be found in 100 kits from our first production run, make sure you get your kit early to stand a chance of finding one of these free gifts!

03
SEP
2015

New St Peters Beer Kit – Honey Porter

Muntons are pleased to announce the new addition of the Honey Porter to the St Peter’s brewery beer kit range. This 3kg kit brews 40 pints of traditional English porter with a sweet honey taste and aroma. Developed by Muntons, tested and approved by the head brewer at the St Peter’s Brewery. Honey Porter is the fifth beer kit in the popular St Peters brewery kit range.

The kit is based on the bronze award winning recipe (the national honey show 2012) of the St Peter’s brewery Honey Porter. This 40 pint kit brews a rich and sweet porter with a final strength of approx. 4.5 % ABV. Enjoy the unique taste of St Peters beer brewed by your own fair hand.

Established in 1996, St Peter’s brewery is based in Suffolk and is housed in the grounds of the medieval St Peter’s Hall. The brewery produces a wide variety of different beers including many seasonal specials.

As little treat 100 beer mats from St Peters can be found in 100 kits from our first production run, make sure you get your kit early to stand a chance of finding one of these free gifts!

02
SEP
2015

Courage

Muntons has been manufacturing and supplying quality ingredients to the brewing industry since the company was incorporated in 1921. By using our vast experience and knowledge of malt extract production we have become a household name in the global home beer making world.

Our extensive ranges of beer making kits emulate some of the finest beer styles available in the world today such as these classic ales from Courage.

AVAILABLE NOW

Find your nearest stockist here

Click here for the retailer marketing support area